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The Lustrous Colors of Art Deco

“The Lustrous Colors of Art Deco” is the theme of this year’s Looking at Architecture exhibition, held annually to allow visitors to enjoy the beauty and charms of the Former Residence of Prince Asaka (now the main building of the Teien Art Museum), constructed in 1933. Previous themes have included the history, interior decoration, building materials, and various details of the building. This year focuses on colors, a key element of the interior design, as a way to introduce the rich palette of the Art Deco era.

During their stay in France, Prince Asaka and Princess Nobuko were fascinated by the beauty of the Art Deco style, and after returning to Japan, they actively incorporated the spirit of Art Deco into the construction of their own residence. The white of the plaster ceiling, the black of the lacquered columns, the metallic colors of the fittings, the natural hues of the wood and stone, the transparency of the various types of glass, and the lush greenery of the garden seen from the windows—the residence features a wide variety of colors that exude flamboyance and serenity, and continue to charm people even after 90 years.

This exhibition draws upon years of research and study to highlight the colors used in the Former Residence of Prince Asaka, and resurrects the atmosphere of the past by recreating living spaces, a highlight of the annual Looking at Architecture series. Paintings and books from the Art Deco period are exhibited in the galleries in the annex and provide an overview of the color palette popular at the time.

We hope that this exhibition will be an opportunity to enliven your mind with new colors.

Visiting information

Exhibition:

Looking at Architecture 2021
The Lustrous Colors of Art Deco

Dates:

Saturday, 24 April - Sunday 13 June, 2021

Closed every Monday except for May 3 (holiday), and Thursday, May 6.

Venue:

Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum
5-21-9, Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo
Tel 050-5541-8600

Hours:

10:00 - 18:00 (Last admission at 17:30)

Admission:

  General Group
Adults General¥1,000 Advance/Group¥800
University students General¥800 Advance/Group¥640
Middle & high school students General¥500 Advance/Group¥400
Senior (65 and over) General¥500 Advance/Group¥400

・Figures in parentheses are group admission fees (for groups of 20 or more).
・Admission is free for elementary and younger students and for middle school students residing in or attending school in Tokyo.
・Admission is free for visitors (and two accompanying persons) with a Physical Disability Certificate, Intellectual Disability Certificate, Rehabilitation Certificate, Mental Disability Certificate, or Atomic Bomb Survivor’s Certificate.
・Admission is free for teacher-led educational visits by Tokyo primary, junior high, and high school students.
Admission is free for seniors (65 and above) on the third Wednesday of each month.
Suspended until further notice

 

Organized by

Tokyo Metropolitan Government, Tokyo Metropolitan Foundation for History and Culture, Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum

With the co-sponsorship of

Toda Corporation,
Bloomberg L.P. Bloomberg



Highlights

  • A light-filled Art Deco mansion

    During this exhibition, the museum opens the bespoke curtains on the windows, which are ordinarily kept closed to protect artworks. Visitors can enjoy a soothing time in the residence with a view of the garden outside and the warmth of the soft natural light.

  • Priceless original furniture and interior decorations

    Among the attractions of the Looking at Architecture exhibition are the Former Resident of Prince Asaka’s original furniture pieces and other well-preserved interior decorations. Visitors may also examine photographs of the residence in its early years, which are on display in the exhibition room. The building has undergone repairs and restoration to carefully preserve its historical value.

  • Recreation of original table settings and other atmospheric details

    This exhibition features recreated table settings, as well as other details that allow visitors to imagine how the building looked in its days as a residence. (Photograph from past exhibition)

  • Photography is permitted

    Photography is allowed during the exhibition. Before taking photographs, please be sure to read the following rules and follow the instructions of the museum staff.

    1. This is a museum, so please refrain from any activity that may disturb the people around you.
    2. Please do not use flash, reflectors, tripods, selfie sticks, or telephoto lenses.
    3. Staff may ask you to refrain from taking photographs due to safety concerns.
    4. Please refrain from taking video.
    5. To avoid the risk of dropping equipment or damaging objects, please do not take photographs from above objects, or lean your body when taking photographs.
    6. Please be aware that posting photos on social networking sites may violate the portrait rights of other visitors.
    7. Actions that could damage artworks or the building are prohibited.

Related programs

  • Programs to be held during the exhibition will be announced at a later time.
    Information will be posted on this page as details become available.

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Top row from left:Henri Rapin, “Provencal paysage with two children on foot of mountain Sainte-Victoire,” c. 1920-1930; Salon, Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum; Main Staircase, Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum

Middle row from left:Prince’s Sitting Room, Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum, Main Building; La Gazette du bon ton, 1924-25, edited by Lucien Vogel.

Bottom row from left:Front façade of the Main Building of the Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum; Floor mosaic at the Main Entrance of the Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum; Chairs designed by André Groult, backrest painted by Marie Laurencin, made by Adolphe Chaneaux, ca. 1924

All works are in the collection of the Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum.

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